Illustrated Articles

Dogs + Puppies

  • Infectious canine hepatitis (ICH) is a viral infection caused by a member of the adenovirus family. Young dogs are at the highest risk of contracting this virus and signs of disease usually occur within two to five days after exposure. In severe cases, usually in young puppies, along with the fever, depression, and loss of appetite, there is abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, edema (fluid swelling under the skin) of the head and neck, and possibly jaundice. Such cases are often fatal. Treatment is aimed at reducing symptoms and giving time for the dog's immune system to respond, including hospitalization, intravenous fluids, and medications. Vaccination has been very successful at reducing the prevalence of this disease.

  • This handout outlines internal parasites in dogs. Included are parasites of the gastrointestinal tract (roundworms, hookworms, whipworms, and tapeworms), as well as parasites of the circulatory system (heartworm). How each of these parasites can affect your dog and what you can do to prevent or treat infection are all explained.

  • This handout explains juvenile cellulitis (also called Puppy Strangles) in puppies. Characterized by a sudden swelling of the face and muzzle, it can be confused with an allergic reaction or skin infection. The clinical signs are discussed, as well as diagnostic and treatment recommendations to resolve the condition should it occur.

  • Juvenile hyperparathyroidism is a rare, inherited condition of German Shepherds and leads to a constant state of elevated parathyroid hormone, affecting calcium and phosphorus balance within the body. It is an inherited, autosomal recessive trait that causes stunted growth. Removal of anywhere from one to three of the parathyroid glands is performed to bring the calcium levels into a more normal range.

  • Lysosomal storage diseases are a rare collection of conditions that are inherited. Many of them are more prevalent in certain breeds and are seen in the first few months of life. Clinical signs vary depending on the type of disease, but commonly include failure to thrive, incoordination, vision loss, and seizure. Prognosis is usually poor for long-term survival.

  • Mastitis is a term used to describe inflammation of a mammary gland. In most cases, mastitis is caused by a bacterial infection. Trauma to the mammary gland, or prolonged periods of milk accumulation without milk removal, can lead to inflammation within the mammary gland. Most dogs with mastitis can be treated on an outpatient basis with oral antibiotics and pain medications, though severe cases may require hospitalization or surgery.

  • Miscarriage refers to the death of a fetus during pregnancy, with the most common cause being bacterial infection. Hormonal shifts or abnormalities may also cause miscarriages. In many cases, there are no visible signs of miscarriage. If miscarriage is suspected, ultrasound is used to assess the pregnancy and determine whether the fetuses are alive. Finding a cause for the miscarriage, especially if that cause is a treatable condition, may improve outcomes in future pregnancies.

  • Not all puppy foods are alike. Not all pups are alike. Feeding the right diet to the right puppy is very important, especially when it comes to large or giant breed pups.

  • Good hygiene takes practice, but starting early will make keeping your pup clean easier for his entire life. You can start some of these jobs shortly after your puppy arrives home. Be sure to keep a calm voice and use food rewards as positive conditioning to make it a positive experience.

  • The American Animal Hospital Association and American Veterinary Medical Association have established guidelines to standardize preventive health care for dogs, helping them to live longer, healthier lives. This handout provides an overview of the recommendations within these guidelines and why they are so important.